All posts by Dio

Chloe pictured with a friend in front of massive buildings.

Posted On January 10, 2018By DioIn Russian

Имя Обозначает Ребенка

Chloe is from New York City, New York and participated in the 2017 Russia summer program. In my opinion, the most noticeable difference between Russian and American culture is the attention which Russians allot to superstitions compared to the lack of attention Americans accredit to similar beliefs. This struck me hardest while having dinner with my second host mother. I had just finished explaining that despite any Russian heritage, my parents chose to give me a Russian middle name. She smiled and told me an old Russian saying, “имя обозначаетRead More
Pictured is Hudson High School's auditorium with a group of students at an outreach event.
Rahul and Rohan Krishnan both attend high school in Worcester, Massachusetts. Brothers Rahul and Rohan Krishnan share more than just their family: they share the unique experience of living abroad immersed in another culture, language, and family. They each spent a summer abroad with NSLI-Y: Rahul studied Chinese in Shanghai, China over the summer of 2016; and Rohan studied Arabic during the summer of 2017 in Rabat, Morocco. Though they spent their time on program on different continents, both share a passion for outreach and are actively advocating for NSLI-Y.Read More
Moroccan traditional cuisine.

Posted On December 18, 2017By DioIn Arabic

Finding Comfort in Food Abroad

Diana Pham is from Chicago, IL and participated in the 2017 Morocco summer program. Throughout my summer in Morocco, I loved eating all the tajines (طاجين) at school. Most had chicken with potatoes, carrots, zucchini, and cauliflower, topped with caramelized onions and raisins (sometimes prunes). Each day at our school, we would all have tajines with bread or خبز (khobz) and a side of honeydew, watermelon or grapes. Fridays, everyone had couscous (كسكس). I truly loved eating Moroccan food at school, with my host family and with my friends at smallRead More
Heather and her host mom.

Posted On December 1, 2017By DioIn Chinese (Mandarin)

Bonding With My Host Mom

Heather is from Inwood, WV and participated in the 2016-2017 Taiwan year program. Being abroad can be challenging sometimes, especially if you’re abroad for a longer period of time like I was. At first, I had a little trouble connecting with my host family because they were so much older than me with both of my host parents being over 50 and all my host siblings living out of the house except for one very busy grad student at home. I was so afraid of saying or doing something offensive.Read More
Mira at a marketplace.
Mira is from Norman, Oklahoma and participated in the 2017 Tajikistan summer program. When I found out I had made it into the NSLI-Y Tajikistan program, I was in the middle of reading a line during a rehearsal for a play. The script was on my iPad and when I saw the notification, I cut my line short, opened my email, read the acceptance, and began jumping up and down. The people around me were confused because both interrupting rehearsal and jumping up and down where uncharacteristic behaviors, but IRead More
Rebekah doing a ballet pose in front of a famous Russian monument.

Posted On November 19, 2017By DioIn Russian

An Unforgettable Summer

Rebekah is from St. Augustine, FL and participated in the 2017 Russia summer program. Здравствуйте! Меня зовут Ревека. Мне восемнадцать лет, и я живу во Флориде. (Hello! My name is Rebekah. I am eighteen years old and I live in Florida.) NSLI-Y was a wonderful and life-changing experience for me. I never imagined how much I would see and learn in six weeks. I was elated and honored when I received the scholarship to spend the summer studying Russian language and ballet in Moscow. I was not only a high schoolRead More
Grace and a historian at Kirov Library.

Posted On November 19, 2017By DioIn Russian

Reflections on Russian Literature from Kirov

Grace is from Salem, OR and participated in the 2017 Russia summer program. Здравствуйте / Hello, I think that it’s worth saying that unlike many of the NSLI-Y summer program students who joined my Kirov program with a serious interest in foreign service, I initially wanted to participate in the NSLI-Y Russia program simply because I love to read Russian literature. For a long time, my conception of Russia has been tied up in the (translated!) words of Turgenev, Akhmatova, Lermontov, Zamyatin, Kharms, and others. Nevsky Prospekt, dueling, and teatimeRead More
Gavin and his friends jumping on the Salt Lake.
Gavin is from Virginia Beach, VA and participated in the 2015 Turkey summer program. At Harvard, concentration declaration—that is choosing a major—is a significant step in the collegiate experience. For most students, this might be a fairly ordinary event as they join departments with hundreds of peers all studying the same topics. Government, psychology, and economics concentrators display their academic choices to all who will give nominal affirmation, whether it’s Facebook friends, relatives, or onlookers in the dining hall. But, if you study something as “obscure” as Turkish and MiddleRead More
Summer Highlights - Alumni Interactions with Current Participants
NSLI-Y Interactive not only describes the name of our blog, but also the sense of culture within the NSLI-Y community. NSLI-Y alumni interact with the community by writing stories on our blog, pursuing language and diplomacy academically, and supporting current participants. Read below some alumni interaction highlights from the 2017 Summer programs. Persian (Tajiki) On July 4th, the NSLI-Y Persian (Tajiki) students were fortunate to have an NSLI-Y alumni guest speaker. Richard Porter, a recent graduate of the University of Virginia, is a 2013 NSLI-Y alumnus and was in DushanbeRead More
Picture of the Taj Mahal

Posted On November 9, 2017By DioIn Hindi

My Indian Summer

Kate is an alumna of the 2017 Hindi summer program in Indore, India. She is originally from Big Sky, Montana. “Kate! Chalo!” My host mom calls from downstairs, using a common Hindi word meaning, “let’s go”. I grab my bag and run down the stairs. Knowing that we could be going anywhere, I have learned to always have a bag prepared with my raincoat (it’s monsoon season), a few hundred rupees (although my host parents never allow me to pay), my small notebook (filled with Hindi vocabulary), and a shawl toRead More